Pit Bulls » Exotic Bully vs American Bully

Exotic Bully vs American Bully

Exotic Bully and American Bully are both rather modern dog breeds, with the former being introduced only in the early 2000s.

These two breeds are technically cousin. Which is why they often resulting in people misrecognizing them. Keep in mind that even being closely related, they are actually different from each other.

Thus, if you’re looking for one as a pet, it’s essential to know the several characteristics that set them apart. So here, we will briefly compare these two adorable canines to help you understand them better. Read on!

Exotic Bully Vs American Bully – History And Brief Description

While both are part of the Bully dog breeds, the American Bully is the older between these two breeds.

Historically, the origins of American Bully date back to the 1980s. However, they’re only officially recognized as a distinct breed in 2004 by the American Bully Kennel Club.

American Bully is the result of interbreeding American Pit Bull Terriers, Staffordshire Terrier, and Bulldogs. Some types even have other bully breeds or non bully breeds into the mix. 

Exotic Bully VS American Bully

American Bully are classified into several types, with each distinguished by features like size and weight. They are muscular animals with a gentle temperament and perform well as companion dogs.

On the other hand, the Exotic Bully is a recent addition to the bully breed family, being introduced only in 2008. Unlike American Bully, this new breed has not yet received official recognition from some major canine clubs or associations.

Exotic Bully is a mix of an American Bully and a Bulldog, therefore they have the characteristic of both. In fact, at first glance, it’s not uncommon to mistake them as a smaller variation of an American bully.

But on closer look, it’s easy to discern the bulldog-like features such as their flatter faces and bigger heads.

Exotic Bully Vs American Bully – A Comparison

Size

In terms of sizes, Exotic Bully looks smaller when putting them next to an American Bully. They are closer to the ground compared to their closest cousins. 

Usually, American Bully are between 16 to 20 inches tall, with the weight of 40 to 130 pounds. Inversely, Exotic Bully are well under 17 inches, weigh around 30 to 50 pounds.

Since both dog breeds are highly energetic dogs, they eat a lot. This makes them prone to weight gain, especially Exotic Bully since they have smaller stature. Therefore, never overfeed your canine.

Even if your goal is to feed nutritious food that makes your puppy grow bigger, it is not right to let them eat way more than they should.

Appearance

It’s common to misrecognizing both breeds at the first glance, especially when you have no clue about them. 

However, once you have the knowledge, you can easily distinguish them through their appearance. While both breeds have wide heads and muscular bodies, the heads of Exotic Bully are slightly bigger.

In some ways, Exotic Bully is like the exaggerated version of the American Bully. They have much more exaggerated features such as wrinkly faces, more muscle, flatter face, and shorter muzzles compared to American Bully.

Temperament 

Both American Bully and Exotic Bully have similar temperament.

Both dog breeds are friendly, affectionate dogs that get along well with families as well as children. The quirky nature of theirs have made them one of the top choices as companion dogs.

Both dogs are quite energetic, although the energy levels of an American Bully tend to be higher.

Thus, always create activities and bring them out for exercising or walking to channel out their energy. Keeping them locked at home will make them feel frustrated and become destructive. 

American Bully and Exotic Bully are highly trainable as well, albeit training them required a lot of patience. This is since bully breeds in general tend to be a little stubborn.

Hence, the most effective training method you can use to train any bully breed is the rewards-based training.

A constant positive approach and committed training are essential to have a well-behaved American Bully or Exotic Bully in your neighborhood as well as the doggy society.  

Price

The price of an Exotic Bully is almost as expensive as a Micro Bully. The same reason why Micro Bully is so expensive, Exotic Bully is a fairly new breed and it is difficult to look for a breeder that will properly and ethically breed one.   

Exotic Bully usually prices at $5,000, and can easily go up to $10,000 or more, depending on the sizes, coat colors and look.

For American Bully, since they already have a standard breeding standard, you can get one at an average price of $2,000 onwards.

Summing Up

Exotic Bully vs American Bully

To conclude, despite both American Bully and Exotic Bully looking somewhat similar yet different in their features, it’s an undeniable fact that both breeds are an excellent choice for a family companion dog.  

In addition, contrary to their appearance and the stereotype surrounding them, both dogs are actually gentle, sociable, and affectionate.

They are able to form strong bonds with their human families. Besides, they’re also great around children. 

All in all, regardless which breed you have, you’re guaranteed to get an adorable and loving companion who will always be eager to spend time with you. 

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Author: PitBulls.org

We aim to be the premier resource for American Pit Bull Terrier and their humans. Most areticles are wrote by Matt and Tonya, who own a ridiculously adorable Pit Bull/Lab mix.

We’ll also bring attention to the most critical news items of the day that relate to owners.

NOTE: We are not veterinarians or veterinary health care specialists! The articles which appear on PitBulls.org are provided on an “as is” basis and are intended for general consumer understanding and education only. Any access to this information is voluntary and at the sole risk of the user.

Nothing contained in articles and or content is or should be considered, or used as a substitute for, veterinary medical advice, diagnosis or treatment.

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