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Gentle leaders,prong collars,harnesses what do you use?

Welcome to Pitbulls.org Forums Pit Bull Talk Training Gentle leaders,prong collars,harnesses what do you use?

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 31 total)
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  • #14542
    Crystalashley627
    Participant

    My Bobo has always had a horrible pulling problem. He wasn’t walked on the leash enough as a pup which is my fault obviously. He had a harness for a while which only gave power to the strongest part of his body,we tried the choke chain which as a dog walker and dog owner I absolutely hate, it hurts dogs more than it helps them I find. We were going to get a gentle leader but I wasn’t sure how he would like it on his face. So we ended up getting a prong collar, I believe these are effective when used correctly and it works for him and I walk a few dogs at work with them. However Bobo gets very excited around new dogs and people and he can hurt himself with the prong collar , he’s currently working on training with sitting calmly when new people are around and when he does he gets a treat but if we lose track of the timing on his commands its impossible to snap him out of fixation.

    So now I’m finally trying to gentle leader, does anyone walk their pit with one of these and have success? Does it really stop pulling like they say?

    #16365
    amberc922
    Participant

    Well in my obedience class when Kira was a puppy there were dogs that pulled like crazy and they used them on them and suprisingly it worked after the dog got over the thing being wraped around its muzzle. I personally use a metal choke. I have trained mine with them and they work just fine. I don’t like prong collars the just seem to much. I think my mom’s pit would benefit from a prong though because her pain tolerance is extreme. You can’t tell others what to use though because everyone’s beliefs are different. In reference to the fixation problem you are having…I use a spray bottle and if they are outside the hose. I trained them that way with the spray bottle. I don’t even have to spray it anymore and it doesnt matter what bottle I grab. I was spraying Febreeze on my bed the other day and they came in the room and as soon as they seen it they took off down the hallway lol. They can be in the biggest trance and fixated on something but the minute I grab the spray bottle they snap out of it. I know that sounds completely crazy but if your dog is not a water dog then try it. It is positive reinforcement so you don’t have to smack on them. I only had to use the hose once when my neighbors crazy mixed little terrier was running my fence and attacking them…that drives them to the breaking point. The only way to snap them out is to grab them if I can catch them or grab the hose. I don’t even spray them I just spray it on the ground and bam they stop and look at me like whow mom sorry…lol.

    #16368
    Bloo
    Participant

    We have tried everything from a regular collar, to a choker, to a gentle leader, before finally being recommended by our trainer to use a prong collar. Our trainer advised us that although she prefers choke collars for training purposes, she uses prong collars for dogs who just will not respond to any other kind. Also, honestly IMO, the gentle leader is a waste of money for any high energy dog like a pit bull. Out of everyone I know with a pit bull, not a single one was able to use the gentle leader. Although, I am not saying it is impossible. If you do get the prong collar, make sure it is adjustable and has a clip. The ones that go over the head just don’t work for a bully’s large head (at least not mine). In order to use a prong collar properly, you must bring it all the way up to where the head and the neck meet. Otherwise they can still pull with it. Also, before we bought the prong collar, my husband put it on arm and pulled as quickly and as hard as he could. (He wanted to make sure it would not hurt our baby) According to him, it does not hurt, it is just very annoying.

    #16371
    Crystalashley627
    Participant

    Amber: My baby boy hates water so that could work, we ended up getting the gentle leader so even if bobo didn’t like it one of my dogs at work could be walked with it. The size I got fit but was the tightest it could go so I believe if I got one size up it could be more comfortable and there would be more room in case he fills out a bit more seeing he’s not even two yet. Also because it was too small he didn’t like it at all bu I’m going to use it on my small pit and get him a larger one, even with it on the lead was very lose and I could tell it could work with him but we will try a spray bottle for his fixations Thanks!

    Bloo: We already have/use a prong collar, we have since about July, I’m a professional dog walker so I know how to use them, the pulling stops but as far as his fixations go, the prong collar isn’t enough to snap him out of it and I don’t want to drag and hurt him which is what I’m left doing sometimes. As for the gentle leader, I don’t believe it is for every pit , my boy could probably benefit from it if I get the right size.

    What I might do with him is we are getting him a new leather collar for Christmas ,I might start all over again with the new collar and the second he pulls I’ll go the opposite way and praising and just working on it. Its the more time consuming way of training him but the new collar will be a blank slate for him so it will probably more effective in the long run.Thanks

    Thanks you guys!

    #16488
    KaylasMom
    Participant

    We use a Gentle Leader for Kayla and it has worked wonders! But, we only use it when we are going to places that she has never been to before. Otherwise, she is on a flat collar. Even though you have a “tool” to use that will help curb pulling, it still isn’t teaching the dog not to pull. The dog needs to LEARN not to pull and not just have a special collar or something to prevent it.

    Gentle Leaders are just like the head halters that horses use. If you can move a 2500 pound creature like a horse with something as simple as a head halter, you can control a dog.


    @Crystalashley627
    : The GL is to be tight against the back of the head, almost to the point that it seems to be way too tight. You should barely be able to slip one finger between the head and the strap. The strap over the muzzle should actually be pretty loose. The dog should be able to open their mouth, drink, eat, and even play ball. It shouldn’t be loose that it falls right off. You should be able to gently pull it down to the top of their planum nasle (the begining of the leathery part of their nose).

    Yes, many dogs have trouble with the GL at first, but it does take time for them to get used to it. They will paw at it, and try to take it off. Kayla will still do that from time to time, but we pair the GL up with a treat when we put it on her.

    Harnesses are ok for smaller dogs, but for bigger dogs, they just encourage pulling. The Easy Walker Harness by Premier has the leash attachment in the front, at the chest area. When the dog pulls, the dog then turns around to face you. The only problem with many harness is that it will rub the pits of our pitties due to the way the dogs are built.

    If you would like more info on how to teach a dog to not pull without the use of choke/prong, GLs, and harnesses, let me know.

    #16658
    BarbaraT
    Participant

    With my two dogs, I found Harnesses do the trick. But every dog is different.  and i use durable buckle harnesses and collars because the strength my guys have they break plastic snap in collars and harnesses. And i always have a collar on them just encase the harness were to break. Just a safety measure…

    #16821
    i luv my pitbull
    Participant

    Herman can be a puller also, so I feel ya there. I used prong collars years ago, before I knew what they do. The real test for the prong collar is to put it on your neck, not the arm. I use the “Easy Walk” harness. Training is still necessary, but the “Easy Walk” does help. I speak only for myself, so take it for what it’s worth. Good luck.

    #16862
    Pit Crew
    Participant

    There’s many different solutions but the main thing to establish with your dog is that your walking him/her not the dog walking you. If your dog starts to pull then simply turn and walk the other way then after a few steps and cont. to proceed and if he/she pulls again repeat process. It has worked for all three of my dogs I would reccomend trying it. I wish you the best of luck to you and your bully.

    #17000
    jsscdwny
    Participant

    I use the chain choker collar. Lady always pulls really hard at the begining of her walk because she is so excited, but I have severe tendenitis in my wrist. So what I do when shes really tryin to drag me to the path is stop walking and say very seriously “lady Stop” and I dont move at all until she losens up and walks to me with that silly “whats goin on?” look. Thats how I started, she is much better now but shes stubborn. Now when I have to stop walking and say “Lady Stop” she automatically stops and waits for me to walk. They are stubborn as hell but smart enough to know the sooner she stops the sooner I will allow her to continue her walk. The first few walks we went on I had to do this like every ten steps, but she got it. Also I didnt get her until after she was a year old, she had never been on a leash and never even been in a house. So if she can pick it up that easy I’m sure its at least worth a try. Good luck.

    #17042
    kendseycollins
    Participant

    I have used pronged and choke collars and easy leads.  What I have found is that, with pits, because they are higher energy and have a high pain threshold, if they are intent on something, they will just lean into whatever it is, no matter what.  I have come to realize that there is no substitute for proper training.  I used the turn-the-other-way method.  Kaos is very strong and sometimes gets excited to play with other dogs as well.  We have worked hard on obedience with him he will sit while another dog passes, but he will still get so excited that, even though he is sitting, hes whining and shaking.  I finally started taking him to the soccer fields.  There are closed off tennis courts close by and I’ll let him run off some energy first so he’s not so fresh.  Then we’ll walk close enough to the soccer fields to catch his interest, but not so close that we don’t have room to work.  I don’t wait for Kaos to start pulling.  I want him to stay beside me on a loose lead.  If he gets too far infront of me I use the “come” comand and short tugs until he turns and follows me (which places him behind me.)  The thing is, you have to wait till the dog is actually following you before you reward him becuase, at first, Kaos just sort of turned sideways and continued to try and pull in the same general direction.  I would keep tugging and changing my direction until he truly turned and gave his attention to me.  I would then walk a few steps with him in the correct position, stop and have him sit, then reward him.  Sometimes I would end up doing a full 360 degree circle or more before he would truly break his fixation.  It seems to be working very well though and is much better at encouraging him to actually give me his attention, rather than just not pull on the leash.  Now I don’t use any type of aid, I just put in the extra time to teach him properly.  I’ve also found that teaching tricks can help becuase it gives your dog something to focus on other than what is going on around him.

    #17043
    kendseycollins
    Participant

    You are right that the head collar is similar to a horse halter, the difference is the mentality and facial structure of the animal.  Horses are flee animals and by nature give into pressure.  Plus, the way a horses head is designed, the halters work with sensetive pressure points to lend control.  A dog has the same pressure points, but becuase the angle you are pulling at is different, the pressure is different.  Dogs are fight animals by nature (I’m not talking about dog fighting, I’m talking about genetic self-defense mechanisms. Horses are herd animals and programmed to run from predators.  Dogs are pack animals and are programmed to protect themselves.)  The basic principal is the same and the head collars can certainly be helpful in making training easier on your hands, but they don’t address the fixation problem.  Only proper training will create a confident, relaxed dog.

    #17044
    MollyandBud
    Participant

    Hi folks,

    This is my first post, so bear with me if I am posting under the wrong subject.

    My problem may be not so much which collar to use, but how to get my pups to walk on leash outside the perimeters of our yard! Both pups are four months old. I trained them to walk on a leash in our back and front yards, and both do great…..as long as we stay in the yard. If I try to advance them to walking down the street, my boy, Buddy, slams down on his belly and uses his front paws as a braking mechanism. My red-nose girl, Molly, waits till we get to the edge of the our property, then straightens all four legs, stops, and stares at me with her green, old-soul eyes – by her expression, one would think I am asking her to roll over Niagara Falls in a barrel.

    I’ve been using choke collars, since they were recommended by our vet. Is there a better collar to use? Could the collar possibly be our problem?As I wrote, they both do great….inthe yard.

    BTW, I live in a wonderful, dog-friendly, city neighborhood. That’s one of the main reasons I moved here 23 years ago. The only traffic on our street is the locals. The problem can’t be other pets, because my pups were raised with two cats, an elderly poodle and their self-proclaimed pack leader, a seven-pound Peekapoo.

    If there is a better collar (harnesses, perhaps?), please tell me. Otherwise, I may need to start a new thread, eh?

    Thanks for having patience with a newbie!

     

     

     

    #17045
    MollyandBud
    Participant

    Hi folks,

    This is my first post, so bear with me if I am posting under the wrong subject.

    My problem may be not so much which collar to use, but how to get my pups to walk on leash outside the perimeters of our yard! Both pups are four months old. I trained them to walk on a leash in our back and front yards, and both do great…..as long as we stay in the yard. If I try to advance them to walking down the street, my boy, Buddy, slams down on his belly and uses his front paws as a braking mechanism. My red-nose girl, Molly, waits till we get to the edge of the our property, then straightens all four legs, stops, and stares at me with her green, old-soul eyes – by her expression, one would think I am asking her to roll over Niagara Falls in a barrel.

    I’ve been using choke collars, since they were recommended by our vet. Is there a better collar to use? Could the collar possibly be our problem?As I wrote, they both do great….in the yard.

    BTW, I live in a wonderful, dog-friendly, city neighborhood. That’s one of the main reasons I moved here 23 years ago. The only traffic on our street is the locals. The problem can’t be other pets, because my pups were raised with two cats, an elderly poodle and their self-proclaimed pack leader, a seven-pound Peekapoo.

    If there is a better collar (harnesses, perhaps?), please tell me. Otherwise, I may need to start a new thread, eh?

    Thanks for having patience with a newbie!

     

     

     

    #17053
    kendseycollins
    Participant

    Lol.  I would make it as positive as I could!! LOTS of praise and treats.  Give them time to explore and gain confidence.  You can work on focus excercises to get them to focus on you rather than their surroundings.  Also, finding a place for them to play and be rambunctious puppy explorers is great!  It’s all about building confidence and getting them out there and exposing them to as many different positive situations as possible.  If they have confidence in themselves and in you they will be happy, outgoing dogs.  Just remember to give them their time becuase, just like with kids, the world outside the front yard is scary, and make all reinforcement positive to help them enjoy the outings.  As far as collars and leads go, it’s whatever your dogs work best with as long as they aren’t pullers.  The choke collar isn’t my favorite.  But, if they are comfortable with the choke and work well with it, there is no reason to add more unfamilliar things to a new situation.

    #17083
    mich24ee
    Participant

    My dogs are both terrible at pulling on the leash. They are 1 1/2 and 1 and are almost to strong for me to hold back. I want to traing them not to pull but have had someone say be carfeul with the choke collar because if they pull it could cut through their throat. I just don’t know what way to go? Any advise would be appreciated. I love my dogs and I dont want them to get hurt.

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